an easy chive vinegar you can make with the blossoms

This weekend marks the end of the Chelsea Flower Show and what better time to celebrate the diverse and rich experience that flowers can give us in culinary terms.

The chives at Harts Barn where I have my culinary studio are currently in bloom. It seems unfair to me that the chive flower is much overlooked as a herb. Chive flowers have a mild onion/garlic flavour and are far more delicate than chive stems.

Photography: Dawn Langley

I use edible flowers a lot in my work. Making floral vinegar is just one of the ways that edible flowers can be used in the kitchen and this can easily be achieved without a lot of equipment.

Chive vinegar has the flavour of alliums but isn’t too overpowering. It is a useful way to add extra flavour to your salad dressings and uses the part of the chive that most people discard – the blossom. It is extremely straightforward to make and can be stored indefinitely in the refrigerator.

YOU WILL NEED

1 cup of chive blossoms

3 cups/750 ml apple cider or white wine vinegar

1 teaspoon black peppercorns

A kilner jar (mason jar)

A sieve or strainer

METHOD

  1. In a sterilised kilner jar (mason jar), add the chive blossoms and peppercorns and top with your vinegar of choice. Apple cider vinegar and white wine vinegars are great vinegars to choose as they have a milder flavour.
  2. Seal the jar well and leave for 1 – 2 weeks, turning the jar over every few days so as to ensure the flower petals are immersed in the vinegar.
  3. The longer you leave the flowers to infuse, the stronger the vinegar will become.
  4. After 1 – 2 weeks, strain the vinegar to discard the blossoms and store the vinegar in a sealed bottle in the refrigerator.

The chive blossoms are delicious once they have been immersed in the vinegar and are a useful alternative to pickled onions.


 

Photography: Dawn Langley

Photography: Dawn Langley

If you’d like to learn more about how to preserve and ferment all kinds of raw foods, from tree nut cheeses to herbs and from kefir to kombucha… plus learn how to make more from it such as kimchi noodle soup and kombucha ice cream floats, then you may be interested in  Cultured, my weekend intensive in how to make fermented raw foods on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th June 2016, UK.